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Type II Diabetes

Diabetes is growing.  It is difficult to believe that one of the most preventable diseases we know takes such a large toll on Canadians lives.  Yet armed with the knowledge to prevent diabetes, we still witness dramatic increases in both the Canadian and world population.

Diabetes is characterised by a constellation of symptoms: increased thirst, increased hunger, increased urination, and blurred vision.  For the most part, these symptoms are the result of one trigger – too much sugar in the blood.  Sugar is a paradox in our bodies.  On one hand, it feeds almost every cell in our system.  On the other, in excess it destroys our tissues.  At some point after a time of consistent elevated blood sugar, the body stops responding to the sugar.  Insulin, the sugar regulator in our blood, refuses to recognize sugar and stops transporting into the cells that so desperately need it to fuel them.  The issue is then twofold: our cells are starving for food and our blood is engorged with it.

Diet and lifestyle behaviours are paramount to reversing the effects of these sugar overload problems.  Regular activity tells the insulin receptors to take in more sugar.  Decreasing the amount of dietary refined sugar reduces the overall load in the blood.  Eating more fibre, protein, and fat in proportion to sugar allows the body to significantly slow digestion disabling any quick dumping of sugar into the bloodstream.  Consuming more blood sugar metabolisers like cinnamon, chromium and other trace minerals also help stabilize blood sugar levels.  There are many ways to prevent and treat diabetes.

In order to better understand this condition please consult a qualified healthcare practitioner at evolve Nurturing Vitality.

Dr. Bobby Parmar
Naturopathic Physician

evolvevitalityType II Diabetes

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