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Sinus pain relief with Acupuncture

If you have ever suffered from a cold, allergies, sinus congestion or asthma, you will likely have experienced some sinus pain or pressure. With acupuncture and dietary change, patients often report they need fewer medications and feel better sooner.

In Traditional Chinese Medicine theory, the root of this condition is often due to invasion of wind-heat or wind-cold along with an improper diet. Symptoms of wind-heat attack (most common cause) can include a stuffy nose, nasal discharge (yellow/green, thick), headache, aversion to cold and fever.

If you suffer from chronic sinus problems, eliminating all milk products and raw foods from your diet can be helpful. In addition, certain herbs used in Chinese medicine are beneficial in boosting the immune system and thereby reducing the symptoms of sinus related conditions.

Some homecare suggestions include pressing on specific acupressure points to alleviate sinus pain.  The first acupressure point is on the Large Intestine (LI) meridian. LI 4 (HeGu) is located between your thumb and index finger, at the highest spot of the muscle. This point is the command point for the face and mouth.  The second point to try is LI 20 (Ying Xian), it is located underneath your eyes, just below your cheekbones closer to your nose.  Apply gentle pressure on these points and hold for about 2-3 minutes as you breathe slowly and deeply.

For more information, please consult one of your healthcare practitioners at evolve Nurturing Vitality®.

Patricia Petersen

Registered Acupuncturist

evolvevitalitySinus pain relief with Acupuncture

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